Big problems call for big ecology. Big ecology needs big data.

Big problems call for big ecology. Big ecology needs big data…so starts the newest paper from our group: “Are We Filling the Data Void? An Assessment of the Amount and Extent of Plant Collection Records and Census Data Available for Tropical South America” published open access in PLoS ONE.  The general gist of the paper is that we have lots of data for tropical plants, but we still needs lots and lots more!

Are We Filling the Data Void? An Assessment of the Amount and Extent of Plant Collection Records and Census Data Available for Tropical South America

KJ Feeley
April 30, 2015DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0125629

ABSTRACT: Large-scale studies are needed to increase our understanding of how large-scale conservation threats, such as climate change and deforestation, are impacting diverse tropical ecosystems. These types of studies rely fundamentally on access to extensive and representative datasets (i.e., “big data”). In this study, I asses the availability of plant species occurrence records through the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) and the distribution of networked vegetation census plots in tropical South America. I analyze how the amount of available data has changed through time and the consequent changes in taxonomic, spatial, habitat, and climatic representativeness. I show that there are large and growing amounts of data available for tropical South America. Specifically, there are almost 2,000,000 unique geo-referenced collection records representing more than 50,000 species of plants in tropical South America and over 1,500 census plots. However, there is still a gaping “data void” such that many species and many habitats remain so poorly represented in either of the databases as to be functionally invisible for most studies. It is important that we support efforts to increase the availability of data, and the representativeness of these data, so that we can better predict and mitigate the impacts of anthropogenic disturbances.

First two to fledge

Congratulations to Brian and Evan!

Brian Machovina and Evan Rehm both successfully defended their dissertations earlier this spring.

Yesterday, Brian was awarded his doctorate diploma at the the FIU commencement ceremony (Evan is off in Saipan tracking birds). At the commencement ceremony, Brian was singled out and recognized by the FIU president, Mark Rosenberg, as a “Worlds Ahead” graduate.  This recognition was in honor of Brian’s long and winding history at FIU (he has been with FIU for 25 of its 50 years!) and his extremely successful dissertation research.  Way to be “World ahead” Brian!

All of us in the upwithclimate team are extremely proud of both Brian and Evan.  We are sad that they will are leaving FIU but we look forward to ongoing collaborations with them in the future.

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